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July 19, 2006

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MCNS

"Jerry Mulligan"

Jerry Mulligan came to see me
Dropped his hat in the chowder pot
Put it on as he was leaving
Said my word, it's getting hot

Good fish chowder, good clam chowder
Makes you want to cry for more
Fills you up from your top to your toenails
Makes you hear the ocean's roar

Five fat shrimp behind his earlobes
Four fat squid with forty toes
Six fat oysters, eight fat scallops
Hanging from his hair and nose

He turned to me as he was leaving
Said goodbye as he shook my hand
Just as a wave ran down his shirtsleeve
Left me holding a ton of sand

Good clam chowder, good fish chowder
Has anybody seen my shoe
Nancy dropped it in the chowder
I was saving it for the stew

-- John Ciardi

MCNS

I realize the above digresses from the spicy Indian chicken theme, but the opening reference to Boston lobster put me off on a seafood tangent...

Mrs. Peperium

I love it. Mr. P's biggest seafood tangent was when he was reading Moby Dick. He kept requesting chowder because of all the literary mentions of clams, potaoes and milk mixed with crumbled common crackers.

Mandingo Jones

"I love it. Mr. P's biggest seafood tangent was when he was reading Moby Dick. He kept requesting chowder because of all the literary mentions of clams, potaoes and milk mixed with crumbled common crackers."

Nice, very nice, comfort food of the sea and of the classics...but don't forget to also add a good lump of butter, a bit of heavy cream, and a liberal splash of Bermudian sherry hot pepper sauce - dry sherry infused with small hot peppers!

Then there is also curried lobster to consider.

Totally unrelated but fun:

William Makepeace Thackeray

Curry

Three pounds of veal my darling girl prepares,

And chops it nicely into little squares;

Five onions next prures the little minx

(The biggest are the best, her Samiwel thinks),

And Epping butter nearly half a pound,

And stews them in a pan until they’re brown’d.

What’s next my dexterous little girl will do?

She pops the meat into the savoury stew,

With curry-powder table-spoonfuls three,

And milk a pint (the richest that may be),

And, when the dish has stewed for half an hour,

A lemon’s ready juice she’ll o’er it pour.

Then, bless her! Then she gives the luscious pot

A very gentle boil - and serves quite hot.

PS - Beef, mutton, rabbit, if you wish,

Lobsters, or prawns, or any kind fish,

Are fit to make a CURRY. ‘Tis, when done,

A dish for Emperors to feed upon.

Mrs. Peperium

Thank you Mandingo. I love that too. I love Thackeray so much that I had a pet Siamese fighting fish named Makepeace. Note how I'm still staying on the seafood tangent though now we've moved more into the sushi zone. I need to find that Bermudian hot pepper sauce of which you speak.

Mandingo Jones

Here it is - the real stuff from the oldest British colony.
http://www.outerbridge.com/mainindex.htm

But, you can make your own as I do, because I have a hard time finding it in NY stores.

Take a bunch of dried hot peppers - you can buy them at the gourmet store I guess - little long ones and red, and place them in a curet which you have filled with the dry sherry of your choice. i like the Spanish La I~na.You can also do dry vermouth or rum. Break one pepper to get the seeds into the sherry if you want, but this is optional. Place the curet in the refrigerator and shake once in a while, or you can start using it the next day. The flavor gets hotter the more you keep it. Good in bloody marys too!

All this talk of seafood - I will make oyster stew ala Grand Central Oyster Bar this weekend.

Cheers!

Mrs. Peperium

I used to do this with vinegar. But sherry would be so much more nicer. Oyster stew - terrific stuff. Enjoy.

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